Jade Bird Debuts Self-Titled Album

8 hours ago

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Finally today, some music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMETHING AMERICAN")

JADE BIRD: (Singing) You don't call me now, and I don't think too much about you. But when she's not around, I can feel you're lonely. Oh, I can feel you're lonely somehow.

PFEIFFER: That's Jade Bird singing one of her breakthrough songs, "Something American." She's 21 but sings like a much older soul. And although her musical interests are diverse, she often gets described as a country and Americana musician. That's even though she's British.

Stories of first-generation Americans tend to stress the same struggles. How do you fit in with your peers when your parents aren't assimilating? How do you balance your instinct to rebel against your parents with your awareness of what they sacrificed to get here?

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Finally today, some music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMETHING AMERICAN")

JADE BIRD: (Singing) You don't call me now, and I don't think too much about you. But when she's not around, I can feel you're lonely. Oh, I can feel you're lonely somehow.

PFEIFFER: That's Jade Bird singing one of her breakthrough songs, "Something American." She's 21 but sings like a much older soul. And although her musical interests are diverse, she often gets described as a country and Americana musician. That's even though she's British.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Finally today, some music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMETHING AMERICAN")

JADE BIRD: (Singing) You don't call me now, and I don't think too much about you. But when she's not around, I can feel you're lonely. Oh, I can feel you're lonely somehow.

PFEIFFER: That's Jade Bird singing one of her breakthrough songs, "Something American." She's 21 but sings like a much older soul. And although her musical interests are diverse, she often gets described as a country and Americana musician. That's even though she's British.

Christians around the world gathered on Sunday to mark the end of Holy Week and celebrate Easter.

Festivities took on many forms. While some worshipers reenacted the Passion of the Christ, others gathered for candle-lit services or colorful processions.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

At least 200 people have been killed and hundreds more wounded in eight blasts across Sri Lanka. The coordinated bombings targeted luxury hotels and churches in the country. Joining us now to discuss the latest news is journalist Lisa Fuller, who joins us from Colombo. Lisa, what have you seen there on the ground?

Journalist, novelist and polemicist Rose Wilder Lane may be the most controversial woman nobody's ever heard of. Today she's known primarily for her turbulent collaboration with her famous mother, Laura Ingalls Wilder, on the Little House on the Prairie books. But Lane's story doesn't end there — far from it. A fire-breathing libertarian, she denounced Social Security as a "Ponzi scheme" and grew her own food to protest World War II rationing.

On a bright Sunday afternoon in early March, the Tamir River in the steppes of Mongola becomes a bowling alley. Two dozen Mongolian herdsmen have gathered to play musun shagai, known as "ice shooting." Right now, the ice on the river is perfect. Clear and smooth. The players are cheerful and focused.

Their goal? To send a small copper puck called a zakh down a 93-yard stretch of ice and knock over several cow ankle bones, painted red, none bigger than a golf ball, at the other end. Extra points for hitting the biggest target, made of cow skin.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

HBO's new period drama, Gentleman Jack, is set in the 1830s and tells the extraordinary story of Anne Lister: landowner, businesswoman, mountaineer, and sometimes called "the first modern lesbian." Lister came from a wealthy family in Halifax, England, and began recording her love affairs with women in coded entries in her diary. Eventually she would live openly with her neighbor Ann Walker as a couple. Those explicit diaries remained a secret until the 1980s — and in 2011 they were named by UNESCO as a pivotal document in British history.

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